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This is a fascinating long form article on what is described as one of the "most difficult and dangerous hostage cases ever handled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation".

The article takes advantage of the modern web by interweaving video, audio, and images to create an interactive experience. Instead of just reading text you have the feeling of being immersed in this event.

There seems to be an endless debate on whether Twitter is and BuzzFeed are creating a society where anything over 500 characters is 360 characters too many. And yet there are sites that are specifically dedicated to long form content. Checkout Longform.org which serves as an aggregator of long form content.

Long form content requires an investment of time. But if it' a topic that you are curious about, it wont feel like an investment (when you watch your favorite TV show, do you feel like you are investing the time into it?). I think how the WSJ presented this story is quite powerful, and may bring a broader appeal to long form content. In a world of snacking content, it's great to have a full meal every once in a while. Seth Godin put it really well in a podcast he appeared on:

Most people are busy clicking to the next thing already. That constant clicking to the next thing might be the reason you are feeling incomplete. Maybe what we ought to be doing is spend less time clicking on the next thing and more time sitting with this one to do it right.