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Where does it all go? Your favorite tweets. Kindle highlights. Podcast quotes. Handwritten notes in your notebook. Evernote and OneNote notes you tag as "inspirational" and "dontforget". Blog posts you've favorited.

You have a methodical process for saving information you want to remember. But do you have a process for reviewing it?

Ideally all of this content would be compartmentalized in your brain and you wouldn't need to store it anywhere else. You would summon it as needed and it would always be there. Unfortunately for most of us our brain does not support us in this manner.

As a species when we are physically limited in doing something, we invent technology to compensate. Enter the personal computer, internet, smart phones, and software like OneNote and Evernote. When our brain runs out of room for the 100th Ted quote, we store it in the cloud.

We are really good at storing this stuff.

We are not so good at reviewing/remembering it.

Say two years ago I listened to a podcast episode that had a profound idea related to marketing. Let's further say that this quote would be very beneficial for me to remember at this moment. Assuming that I remember saving the quote two years ago, I should be able to find it. But what if I don't remember writing the quote down. I don't even remember it existing. How would I see it again?

Out of sight, out of mind.

The iPod solved this problem for music. I have a Mp3 music library of over 10,000 songs. At any given point in time I only remember 20-30% of the artists and albums I have in the library. So when I want to put on some music, I'm cutting the majority of my library just because my brain remembers a subset of the music I have. The magical feature that solves this is shuffle mode. It randomly selects a song from my library and play it. It's a fantastic experience to be surprised by a song I added several years ago and had forgotten about.

Is there a shuffle mode for the things we want to remember? Is there an Mp3 file equivalent for content? (txt possibly)? We could have "players" to randomly shuffle our content and remind us of the ideas and insights that we wanted to remember in the future.